Sledgehammer's Cycles

Sledgehammer's Cycles
Sledgehammer's Performance and Custom Cycles

Saturday, March 29, 2014

I has an annoyed

Did the company that made my "install it yourself" windscreen use lock tight on the bolts they knew I would be removing?  WTF is that red goop?


Whatever it was, it sure didn't make it easy to take the damn bolt off ... 

10 comments:

burt said...

Yup, probably purple "low-strength" thread locker.

I use it occasionally... but I don't load the threads with it. Just a dab is enough.

Dave H said...

Yeah, that stuff is mostly to prevent the bolt from backing out under vibration.

I find cursing helps loosen it.

Phil said...

Ya want to put some back on, too.
Otherwise, some day down the road you will be scouring Heaven and Earth looking for a replacement for that very, special, bolt.

Ask me how I know this.
;)

drjim said...

Is that bolt bent?

Nosmo King said...

I'm with drjim - unless it's distortion from the camera lens, I'd say the bolt is slightly bent, which contributed to the removal difficulties. I'd suggest finding a straight replacement (plus a spare or two if it's an odd size or configuration, but it looks like just another socket head cap screw), and a matching tap to chase the threads with before re-installation.

Tony Tsquared said...

I feel your pain. I finally got my sheet metal back from that lazy worthless painter that I took it to last December. I have been re-wiring and installing a fairing for the past 10 hours.

Like others have said, a little goop to keep it from vibrating out. With my bike if it doesn't get locktite it gets anti-seize.

Old NFO said...

Yep, locktite and that sucker IS bent (or the camera lens is)...

Nosmo King said...

Had a thought - Loctite can be defeated by heating to 400F, so if you have something secured with Loctite of any strength, and it can withstand heat, stick it in a 400-420F oven for long enough to get it hot all the way through and you'll be able to disassemble it easily when it cools.

There are a few high temp flavors of Loctite that withstand heat to about 650F, but finding them outside of a specialized industrial application is rare.

Nosmo King said...

Had a thought - Loctite can be defeated by heating to 400F, so if you have something secured with Loctite of any strength, and it can withstand heat, stick it in a 400-420F oven for long enough to get it hot all the way through and you'll be able to disassemble it easily when it cools.

There are a few high temp flavors of Loctite that withstand heat to about 650F, but finding them outside of a specialized industrial application is rare.

abnormalist said...

This is why there are different color lock tites.

Red is for something you never want to move again (without heat, like blowtorch level heat)

Blue is what you use if you want to change it at some point